Diana Nguyen Dang & Global Citizen

Diana Nguyen Dang, a third year student studying International Studies and Japanese, has been accepted into a Global Citizen internship. As one of two Swinburne students working with the organisation this year, Diana will travel to New York City and spend three months with their advocacy and policy team. It will be a hugely challenging task: researching and writing up reports and connecting with missions to the United Nations. We’re incredibly excited to hear about Diana’s adventures and she has promised to blog her time on Instagram. Her internship starts in August. You can follow her @nekkigoesinternational

If you’d like more details on Global Citizen, go to https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/

If you’re keen to see what other students are up to, check out some of stories about students on study tours, see what you can do during your time at Swinburne, or visit our instagram site for photos from students on tour in Indonesia.

Queen’s Birthday Honours

We are very proud to announce that Dimity Hawkins, Swinburne graduate and PhD candidate, has been awarded an AM. Congratulations Dimity!

“Dimity Hawkins, who founded the 2018 Nobel Peace Prize-winning organisation, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), has been appointed a Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for significant service to the global community as an advocate for nuclear non-proliferation and disarmament. Ms Hawkins is a PhD candidate at Swinburne.” 

You can follow Dimity on Twitter at @DimityHawkins and follow the work of ICAN Australia at @ican_australia

Cultural Study Tour: Indonesia

Locations include Jakarta (economic hub of Indonesia) and Yogyakarta (cultural capital of Indonesia).

Students have the chance to learn about social and political issues facing one of Australia’s closest neighbours in an immersive and self-led environment.

The tour includes the opportunity to work closely with local Javanese university students, visit sites of cultural and historical significance and develop intercultural communication skills. In addition to the tour, students are expected to attend pre and post departure classes for the unit.

This year’s study tour is 15–30 June 2019 and applications are now closed.

If you’d like to inquire about next year’s tour, contact Dr Sal Clark or register your interest @ https://www.swinburne.edu.au/form/sae-study-tours/form/

Applications are open to any student enrolled in a Bachelor of Arts / Bachelor Media Comms

• Accelerated unit (winter term)
• 12.5 credit points
• OS HELP loans are applicable and scholarships may be available

On exchange in Indonesia

Here we print a guest blog post by Harrison Lowe who is currently on exchange at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM) in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. 

By Harrison Lowe

Before I came here I was aware that there was an upcoming election. When I arrived here, I was reminded of the upcoming election by the flags and posters that lined the streets. Months out from the election, and the campaign had quite clearly already begun, with flags of all different colours waving, and the face of a different candidate on every billboard or piece of fence.

I found it very hard to grasp the politics here in Indonesia. A lot of the source material is written in Bahasa Indonesia (the Indonesian language), of which I am a beginner, which meant I had to find the limited Australian sources freely available online, and even then, it was hard for me to fully understand the candidates. Through discussions with various teachers and friends, I was able to get a general idea about what each of the candidates stood for, however their election is not as left and right/conservative and progressive as I am used to. From my extremely basic understanding, the differences between the candidates came more from their backgrounds, and their perspective of the role of religion in society.

Aside from my limited Bahasa, another key challenge of learning about the election in depth was the fact that – as I am not a citizen – I am required to be politically neutral during my time here, which means not showing support for either candidate or any party. This made it a sensitive topic to talk to people about, as it was hard to establish if what they were telling me was factual, or perhaps biased. Because of this, I failed to learn as much as what I would have liked to about each of the candidates, and the election in general.

Despite my lack of knowledge, being perceived as politically neutral was at times difficult, and there were ways which even the most innocent foreigner could implicitly support a candidate, without even knowing. This happened to me.

Whenever you go to popular areas in Jogja, Indonesian people – usually children – will come up to you and ask you for a photo. The three Australian’s I am here with, and myself, were at the main street one night, early in our stay here. A group of boys came up to us and asked us for a photo, so we took one with them. In the photo, they all had one finger raised, so us four Australians did the same thing, trying to fit in with the Indonesian boys. As it happens, most hand gestures here represent a political party or figure, so, by copying these boys, we had inadvertently thrown our support behind President Jokowi.

It’s not a big deal, and everyone has been very relaxed about innocent mistakes such as that, but it was a good thing to learn.

Ramadan (09/05)

One of the biggest cultural differences I have observed whilst living in Yogyakarta (Jogja) compared to living in Australia is the position that religion has in society. I was quickly introduced to this, when my ‘buddy’ from UGM – who is Balinese – gave me a Hindu bracelet upon meeting me. Many people who have driven me around have copies of holy books in their car, or various other religious symbols or objects. They even have their religion included on their ID card.

The most dominant religion practiced in Jogja is Islam. Every day, at various times, you are able to hear the call to prayer, which is broadcast out of Mosques (Masjid), to call all Muslim people to prayer. You can hear it in Jogja at 4 am, 12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm and finally, at 7 pm. I was told about this prior to coming, so I was able to get used to it very quickly, and I often don’t notice it through the day anymore.

This month marked the beginning of Ramadan, which is observed by many people here in Jogja. During Ramadan, Islamic people fast from the 4 am call to prayer, until the 6 pm call to prayer rings out. On the evening before Ramadan began, my friend had to get to bed early, and wake up at 3 am in order to eat before he began fasting. Those observing Ramadan are unable to eat or drink anything during the day, so I think it is respectful to try and avoid doing so as much as possible in their presence – something I have had to pull myself up on a couple of times. Whilst fasting, they must continue to go about their daily activities as normal, which is incredible, given they cannot even drink water, and I tend to go through a couple of bottles a day to deal with the heat.

At around 5.30 pm today, I went to a mall, which is on the main street of Jogja. As I was leaving, there were maybe 100 people seated on mats, right along the footpath. They had iced tea, and food boxes in front of them, yet none of them were eating. They were waiting for the call to prayer, to signify the end of fasting for the day. As the call to prayer rang out, they all started eating – breaking their fast together, in the street. This was a very profound experience, and unlike anything else I’ve ever witnessed.

3CR’s Radioactive & Dimity Hawkins

ICAN campaigners in front of the Central Park skyline in New York | Photo: Ralf Schlesener
ICAN campaigners in front of the Central Park skyline in New York | Photo: Ralf Schlesener

3CR community radio station in Melbourne started broadcasting in 1976. The Radioactive Show has been produced at the station for over 20 years and broadcast nationally through the national Community Radio Network. Dimity spoke with the Radioactive Show on 16 February to discuss recent events surrounding nuclear weapons diplomacy, disarmament and disagreement, including the USA and Russian suspension of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty, modernisation of nuclear arsenals and failures of nuclear weapon states to honour their obligations to disarm nuclear weapons. Dimity explains that there is a lot of bad news in this space right now, but also a lot of international advocacy and support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, divestment campaigns, a global Cities Appeal gaining traction, and a growing impatience for a world free from nuclear weapons.

 

Radioactive Show: https://www.3cr.org.au/radioactive/episode-201902161000/us-russia-nuclear-forces-treaty-ends

Treaty update signatures and ratifications: http://www.icanw.org/status-of-the-treaty-on-the-prohibition-of-nuclear-weapons/

Withdrawal INF: http://www.icanw.org/campaign-news/us-withdrawal-inf-treaty-threatens-europe/

3CR’s Radioactive interviews Dimity Hawkins

ICAN campaigners in front of the Central Park skyline in New York | Photo: Ralf Schlesener
ICAN campaigners in front of the Central Park skyline in New York | Photo: Ralf Schlesener

3CR community radio station in Melbourne started broadcasting in 1976. The Radioactive Show has been produced at the station for over 20 years and broadcast nationally through the national Community Radio Network. Dimity spoke with the Radioactive Show on 16 February to discuss recent events surrounding nuclear weapons diplomacy, disarmament and disagreement, including the USA and Russian suspension of the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty, modernisation of nuclear arsenals and failures of nuclear weapon states to honour their obligations to disarm nuclear weapons. Dimity explains that there is a lot of bad news in this space right now, but also a lot of international advocacy and support for the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons, divestment campaigns, a global Cities Appeal gaining traction, and a growing impatience for a world free from nuclear weapons.

 

Radioactive Show: https://www.3cr.org.au/radioactive/episode-201902161000/us-russia-nuclear-forces-treaty-ends

Treaty update signatures and ratifications: http://www.icanw.org/status-of-the-treaty-on-the-prohibition-of-nuclear-weapons/

Withdrawal INF: http://www.icanw.org/campaign-news/us-withdrawal-inf-treaty-threatens-europe/

2019 Welcome/Welcome Back BBQ

Swinburne’s Department of Social Sciences is hosting a welcome/welcome back BBQ for new and returning students.

Friday 15 March, 12:30-3.00pm at Central Gardens (Henry St, Hawthorn) – Week 2.

Food and drink provided.  Bring a picnic rug!

All students in Department of Social Sciences majors are welcome to attend: Chinese; Criminology; Environmental Sustainability; History; Indigenous Studies; International / Global Studies; Italian; Japanese; Philosophy; Politics and International Relations; Sociology.

 

PLEASE RSVP here so that we have a sense of how many people are attending.

Upcoming events at Swinburne

The Italian elections: Where to now?

12 March 2018 at 09.30am in EN 213 – Guest speaker: Massimo Scialla

Massimo Scialla (1946) has a degree in Economics and Commerce from the University of Rome “La Sapienza”. Between 1971 and 2005 Dr Scialla worked at the Banca di Roma (the second largest Italian bank), where he held important responsibilities especially in the international sector. In Sydney, Dr Scialla was Founding Member of the Australian Foreign Bankers Association; Member of the Board of Directors and Vice Chairman of the Italo-Australian Chamber of Commerce and Treasurer of Dante Alighieri Society of New South Wales – Sydney. Dr Scialla was also Member of the Board of Directors of the Italian-Arab Chamber of Commerce – Rome. Has been a frequent speaker at Swinburne University over the years.

Brexit and the process disentanglement from the EU

19 March 2018 at 09.30 in EN 213 – Guest speaker Chris Holtby, British Consul for Victoria.

Chris Holtby was appointed Consul-General in Melbourne in September 2016. From 2012 to 2016 he was Her Majesty’s Ambassador to the Republic of Estonia. From 2007 to 2011, he was Deputy Head of Security Policy Department in the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office, responsible for UK policy on NATO, European Security, military and civil-military operations and co-operation, as well as maritime security. From 2009 to 2011 he was the chairman of Working Group 1 of the international Contact Group on Piracy off the Coast of Somalia. From 2002 to 2007, he was seconded to the European Union in Brussels as UK liaison officer to Javier Solana, the High Representative for Common Foreign and Security Policy, and policy adviser to Dr Solana on Asia/Pacific issues. Chris has worked on Balkans issues and was posted to the UK Delegation to NATO in the 1990s. He was appointed an Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire in 2000.

2018 welcome/welcome back BBQ

Swinburne’s Department of Social Sciences is hosting a welcome/welcome back BBQ for new and returning students.

Friday 2 March 2018
1-3pm
Hammer & Swine Bar (Balcony)
Level 3, UN Building, Swinburne University, Hawthorn Campus

Food and soft drink supplied.
Alcoholic drinks can also be purchased at the bar.
The BBQ will be held on the balcony of the Hammer & Swine Bar.

All students in Department of Social Sciences majors are welcome to attend: Chinese; Criminology; Environmental Sustainability; History; Indigenous Studies; International Studies; Italian; Japanese; Philosophy; Politics and International Relations; Sociology.

PLEASE RSVP here so that we have a sense of how many people are attending.

 

ITALIAN ELECTION 2018: Instability, Uncertainty & Euroscepticism? HEAR THE CANDIDATES

Italians in Italy and abroad cast their vote in Italian elections scheduled for 4 March 2018 to elect their new representatives in the Italian parliament. As we speak, Italians in Australia are receiving their electoral ballot papers and will have the opportunity to cast their vote for their own college of Africa, Asia, Oceania and Antarctica. How will Italians in Australia vote? What impact will votes from abroad have in Italy?

This forum will provide a platform for candidates standing in the Election in Australia’s Electoral College to illustrate their program and political agenda. The forum will also address the governability issue in Italy and the impact votes from abroad might have in the upcoming elections. The event will be moderated by Assoc. Professor Bruno Mascitelli and is sponsored by the EU Centre at RMIT University, the Contemporary European Studies Association of Australia (CESAA), and Swinburne University of Technology.

 

14 FEBRUARY 2018

12:30pm – 2:00pm

 

RMIT, CITY CAMPUS

Emily McPherson Building (Bld 13)

Level 3, Room 9 (Ethel Osborne Hall)

405 Russell Street, Melbourne VIC 3000

 

FREE EVENT

Light Refreshments will be served

RSVP: https://italian-election-2018.eventbrite.com.au

 

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